{ Spot Image }
600 New Hampshire Avenue, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20037
F: 202.556.2001

430 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10022
T: 212.607.8153
F: 212.607.8161



Clerkships
  • Law clerk to the Honorable Robert A. Katzmann, United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
  • Law clerk to the Honorable Jed S. Rakoff, United States District Court for the Southern District of New York
Honors & Awards
  • John Marshall Award for Alternative Dispute Resolution
  • Council of the Inspectors General on Integrity and Efficiency Award for Excellence
Education
  • Columbia Law School, J.D.
  • James Kent & Harlan Fiske Stone Scholar
  • Articles Editor, Columbia Law Review
  • University of Chicago, M.A.
  • Amherst College, B.A., magna cum laude
Bar and Court Admissions
  • New York
  • United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit
  • United States District Court for the Southern District of New York 
  • D.C. bar admission pending; practicing under the supervision of D.C. attorneys

Caleb Hayes-Deats

Photo of Caleb  Hayes-Deats

Caleb Hayes-Deats’s practice focuses on complex civil litigation, appellate litigation, and white-collar criminal matters and investigations.  He has tried cases and argued motions in the Southern Districts of New York and Texas, and has briefed and argued appeals before the Second Circuit.

Before joining MoloLamken, Mr. Hayes-Deats was an Assistant United States Attorney in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York.  As an AUSA, Mr. Hayes-Deats successfully litigated high-profile civil fraud, tax, and Bank Secrecy Act cases involving some of the nation’s largest financial institutions, such as Wells Fargo, AIG, and US Bank.  In 2016, he was part of a team that, after a five-week mortgage-fraud trial, won the 18th largest jury verdict in the country, according to the National Law Journal’s Top 100 Verdicts of 2016.  Mr. Hayes-Deats also helped settle high-stakes cases, winning the Department of Justice’s John Marshall Award for Alternative Dispute Resolution.  

Mr. Hayes-Deats has taught Legal Practice Workshop I & II as a Lecturer in Law at Columbia Law School.

Before working as an AUSA, Mr. Hayes-Deats served as a law clerk to the Honorable Robert A. Katzmann of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit and to the Honorable Jed S. Rakoff of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York.

Representative Matters

  • Member of trial team that won a $298.5 million judgment against a mortgage lender that had fraudulently endorsed mortgages for insurance by the the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (United States v. Americus Mortg. Corp., No. 12 Civ. 2676, 2017 WL 4117347 (S.D. Tex. Sept. 14, 2017)).
  • Member of team that settled mortgage fraud claims against Wells Fargo for $1.2 billion (United States v. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., No 12 Civ. 7527 (S.D.N.Y.)).
  • Member of team that defended the United States against AIG’s claim for a $306 million refund of taxes and penalties (AIG, Inc. v. United States, No. 09 Civ. 1871 (S.D.N.Y.)).
  • Member of team that settled the first ever assessment by the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”) against a financial institution’s Chief Compliance Officer (Treasury v. Haider, No. 15 Civ. 1518 (D. Minn)).
  • Member of team that settled a $70 million dollar FinCEN assessment against US Bank for violations of the Bank Secrecy Act (Treasury v. U.S. Bank, N.A., No. 18 Civ. 1358 (S.D.N.Y.)).
  • Litigated a Title VII claim against the N.Y.C. Department of Education for a high school principal’s systematic discrimination against all of the black teachers she supervised (United States v. N.Y.C. Dep’t of Educ., No. 16 Civ. 4291 (S.D.N.Y)).
  • Won summary judgment disallowing a $4 million tax deduction (Partita Partners LLC v. United States, 216 F. Supp. 3d 337 (S.D.N.Y. 2016)).

Publications

  • Demonstrators’ Right to Fair Warning, 13 FIRST AMEND. L. REV. 140 (2014)
  • Revisiting the Right to Fair Warning After Garcia v. Does, 14 FIRST AMEND. L. REV. 182 (2015)
  • Note, Talk That Isn’t Cheap: Does the First Amendment Protect Credit Rating Agencies’ Faulty Methodologies from Regulation?, 110 COLUM. L. REV. 1818 (2010)